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WCU Stories

Students during the week of kindness

Week of Kindness

Western Carolina University is celebrating a Week of Kindness April 4th – April 8th. Being kind, especially in today’s world, is an easy, tangible way to show someone that they matter and you appreciate them. When we engage in kind acts, we are giving back to those around us. And that is priceless.  

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Aaron Marshall

Forestview High School, WCU graduate’s life of service leads to a new post with the US Congress

Aaron D. Marshall, a 2010 graduate of Gaston County’s Forestview High School and the son of a doctor and a nurse, chose to follow in the spirit of his parents’ footsteps of providing care to those in need. But instead of waiting for the injured to come to him in a nice sterile clinic, he goes to them, following the trail of chaos and destruction left by terrorism, hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes and other disasters.   

Flags on campus

Reflecting on Sept. 11

On September 11, 2001, America changed. Thousands of people lost their lives on that fateful day inside the Twin Towers in New York City, the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., and on a plane in Shanksville, Pa., due to terrorist attacks. In remembrance of the 2,977 lives lost, students and staff from the Center for Community Engagement and Service Learning displayed American flags commemorating those who were lost. Students also reflected on 9/11 and its impact on their lives.  

Student watering a garden

Nursing Students Grow Together Through Gardening

Western Carolina University's School of Nursing garden brings students together with the source of nutrition. To help her School of Nursing students understand the link between health and nutrition, Western Carolina University assistant professor Beth Nease takes them to the source – the nursing school’s organic garden plot where rich, black matter is the star.  

Nursing Students

Nursing Students Assist with COVID-19 Shots

There were nursing students giving shots, church members helping people find their place in line, fraternity brothers directing traffic and other volunteers filling in where needed. Sometimes it takes a village to protect a village, and that certainly was the case when a group of Western Carolina University nursing school students decided to make their senior service learning project a COVID-19 vaccination clinic for Buncombe County’s African American community.  

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Nancy LIddle and Husband Matt Liddle

Nancy Liddle, an I Love WCU Story

As the executive assistant in Western Carolina University’s College of Business, Nancy Liddle sees firsthand the direct impact scholarships make on students. This alone motivates her to be the generous donor that she is.   

Denise Drury-Homewood

Denise Drury Homewood, executive director of the John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center, an I Love WCU Story

Art takes a venue or vehicle, a place online, or physical space to disseminate it. It also takes the artists and performers to make it,” Drury Homewood said. “Plus, it takes the audience to receive that information. At the heart of that Venn Diagram, you will find art and the Bardo Arts Center. It is our job to put all those pieces together.”  

Chris Moore

Fire Marshal Chris Moore '01: An I Love WCU Story

“We may not be out in the light, but you’ll definitely know when the light bulb’s out.” Western Carolina University’s own Fire Marshal, safety professional and alumnus Chris Moore, succinctly noted this when discussing the Facilities Management team’s impact.  

Dr Yanjun Yan

Dr. Yanjun Yan: An I Love WCU Story

Education. Connection. Heart. - As an educational institution, Western Carolina University faculty utilize their vast resources of knowledge to nurture students, use their time to advance the curriculum offered to students, and work with an educational community to stem new ideas. Yanjun Yan is one of these individuals, but the lessons do not stop in the classroom.  

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