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WCU Stories

BaShaun Smith with a mask and text that says Essential WCU

Essential WCU

We successfully wrapped up one of the most difficult semesters in our university’s history and began a new one with many known and unknown challenges ahead. Our employees and students have worked harder than ever amid the challenging circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic to achieve their goals and to make a positive difference in the world.  

Ann Crosby

Care, concern shown from WCU Nurse Anesthesia graduate

Ann Crosby, a certified registered nurse anesthetist found inspiration for her career during a difficult time and Western Carolina University helped provide the means for her goals.  

Sarah Carpenter

WCU graduate student receives Fullerton Medical Scholarship Award

Sarah Carpenter is a firm believer in paying it forward, which is why she and her husband make it point to always give back to their community. So, when Carpenter recently learned she was the recipient of the Fullerton Medical Scholarship Award, the Western Carolina University nurse practitioner graduate student said it was a result of her commitment to giving.   

Rewalk technology

Walk This Way

Thanks to a robotic-assisted physical therapy method underway at a clinic housed in the Health and Human Sciences Building at Western Carolina University, a local man is getting back on his feet - literally. The innovative device is one in a series of products by ReWalk, a medical device company that designs and develops mobility products for individuals with lower limb disabilities. While there are other manufacturers and systems, WCU is one of only two ReWalk training facilities in North Carolina.  

Daniel Tizon 5

EMS student sees service to others as service to self

Daniel Tizon has his sights set on the future, while firmly grounded in the present as a student emergency services technician.  

See His Story  

Students on zoom

Students find old-fashion greeting cards bring joy, comfort to elderly residents in isolation

A simple gesture by a group of Western Carolina University students helped brighten the day — if not the month — of a generation of elderly folks who still place high value on the written word — heart emojis and Facebook likes, be darned.  

Students in a socially distant classroom

Teaching: COVID-19 Style

There was a time when faculty members spent most of their days preparing their lectures, presenting them to their students and being available during office hours for extra instruction. Some also had the additional task of preparing for laboratory work or work outside of campus, such as hospitals and nursing homes. Then came the coronavirus, COVID-19, and a new way of teaching was born.  

Max Domavalage

From Jackson County emergency responder to FEMA, WCU alumnus has found his place

As a child, Max Domalavage had his heart set on becoming a firefighter and a paramedic when he grew up. But it wasn’t the sirens or the uniforms or the big rigs and ambulances racing through the streets that drew Domalavage in. He simply wanted to help people.  

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Environmental health professionals provide additional, much-needed pandemic care

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a public health crisis of historic portions, with the phrase 'frontline workers' becoming a large part of the daily lexicon. And the Environmental Health Program at Western Carolina University has contributed its fair share of professionals to those ranks at the local, state and national levels.  

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