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WCU Stories

forensic anthropology 1

Forensic Anthropology Program expands, gains prominence

In 2019, a research team from WCU’s Forensic Anthropology Program began a concentrated search for the airman, drawing on local interviews, anecdotal information and lots of onsite field work, including excavations. They found Sgt. Francis W. Wiemerslage.  

Myron Jackson

Myron Jackson

Myron Jackson is proud of his success because it taught him to be grateful for the help and support of others. One cannot succeed alone.   

telescope clinic

Learn to use a telescope at clinic

Did you or your family just get a telescope for the holidays but are not sure how to use it? Or do you have a telescope in the closet and want to finally make good use of it?  

Munene Mwaniki

Munene Mwaniki

Getting a PhD certainly isn't easy and there are few Black professors to model after, but Mwaniki also was fortunate in a lot ways and didn't believe that a degree made him smarter than others.  

right whales

History project is helping inform a documentary on endangered right whales

When Vicki Szabo, associate professor of history, finished her 2008 book on medieval whaling, she quipped in the acknowledgements she would remember all her WCU colleagues when it was made into a feature film.   

dave dorondo

Dave Dorondo and class share more than an interest in developing Russia-Ukraine crisis

David Dorondo, an associate professor of history, is watching the escalating tension between Ukraine and Russia with two perspectives. So are his students.   

student recycling 1

Students explore recycling collection for apartments

For a capstone project, an environmental science class delved into the logistics of getting the off-campus apartment complexes in Cullowhee to offer recycling collection services for their residents.  

Aaron Marshall

Forestview High School, WCU graduate’s life of service leads to a new post with the US Congress

Aaron D. Marshall, a 2010 graduate of Gaston County’s Forestview High School and the son of a doctor and a nurse, chose to follow in the spirit of his parents’ footsteps of providing care to those in need. But instead of waiting for the injured to come to him in a nice sterile clinic, he goes to them, following the trail of chaos and destruction left by terrorism, hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes and other disasters.   

brian railsback

Two countries, one literature class, brought together by WCU

Looking for study abroad opportunities in the midst of the pandemic, Brian Railsback, a professor of English, decided to try a virtual study abroad course – but unlike other digital efforts, he wanted to “team up” with a literature class from another country.   

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