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Yumiko Ono, Ed. D

Yumiko Ono

College of Arts and Sciences

World Languages

Contact Information

Email: yono@wcu.edu
Phone: 828.227.3859
Office: 126 McKee Building

Biography

I joined the Department of World Languages in Fall 2010. Since then, I have been privileged to serve students in WCU who are genuinely interested in Japanese language and culture including those who pursue a minor or Interdisciplinary Studies Undergraduate Degree (ISUD, equivalent to a major) in Japanese Studies. I consider myself extremely fortunate to be in the position that I can support and witness students’ development to become mature college students, global citizen, and agent of change by teaching in the Japanese program.<br> <br>I am a native Japanese who has grown up and received education in Japan. I have earned Masters and Doctoral degrees in the U.S. and have been in this country more than 20 years and counting. Among the places I lived in this country, I especially love living in these green mountains because they remind me my hometown in Japan. Nature teaches me humility and patience. I love the scent of trees, rivers, and looking up at so many constellations on quiet winter night having a bonfire.<br> <br>By the way, since the current system would not allow anyone who graduated from foreign institutes to list the names of them here, please allow me to list them correctly because it matters to me.<br> <br>Ed.D, University Of New England<br>MA, University of Massachusetts, Amherst<br>BA, Rikkyo University<br>BA, Nihon University<br>

Education

  • EDD, University of New England
  • MA, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • BA, Foreign Institution
  • BA, Foreign Institution

Teaching Interests

I teach all levels of Japanese language and culture courses that the Japanese program offers. As the program coordinator, my recent teaching interest is how the program as a whole can function to facilitate students’ development of cultural responsiveness, which is one of the program’s parallel students learning goals besides Japanese language fluency. I want to know how the program effectively fosters our students to become global citizens, who can be between and/or among different cultures, societies, and people to effect changes in their community and world.

Research Interests

I finished my doctoral study in summer 2020 and my current research interests is directly connected to my teaching interest: Students’ development of cultural responsiveness through the Japanese program.<br> <br>I am also interested in transcribing writings/textbooks in the 18-19 centuries in Japan, which are written in Japanese manuscript known as Kuzushiji and understanding (or decoding, I should say!) the content. I am interested in ethics for commoners written in Japanese manuscript in that periods.

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