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Kim Hall

Kim Hall faculty photo

 

 Name:  Kim Hall, PhD
Department: Health Sciences
Program: Environmental Health
Rank: Assistant Professor
Title: Program Director
Work Phone: 828-227-2654
Work Email: kkhall@email.wcu.edu
Office address: HHSB 422

Education:
PhD, Environmental Health Sciences, East Tennessee State University
Bachelors, Ecology and Environmental Biology, Appalachian State University

Area of Expertise:
Water Quality
Water and Wastewater Management
Environmental Microbioloy

Primary Teaching Responsibilities:
ENVH 190: From Black Death to Bioterrorism – The Public Health Solution
ENVH 200: Intro to Public Health
ENVH 310/311: Water Quality Control (lecture and lab)
ENVH 320: Institutional and Residential Environments
ENVH 330/331: Food Sanitation and Protection (lecture and lab)

Scholarly Interests:
Evaluation, development, and modeling of fecal pollution and source indicators in surface water for the development of risk assessment models
Alternative methods of Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) development, implementation plans, and Best Management Practices (BMPs) in impaired waters
Sociological aspects associated with BMP implementation in agricultural communities

 Recent Publications and Presentations:

  • Gilfillan, D., K.K. Hall, T.A. Joyner, P.R. Scheuerman. (2018) Canonical variable selection for source tracking models of fecal indicators. Journal of Environmental Quality. In Press: doi:10.2134/jeq2017.12.0474
  • Downing, P.D., C.S. Morgan, and K.K. Hall. (2018) Evaluation of a multiple regression modeling approach to identify patterns of fecal pollution in the Tuckasegee River watershed in Western North Carolina. Abstract, American Society for Microbiology, 2018, ASM Microbe Meeting, Atlanta, Georgia
  • Hall, K.K., T.L. Zontek, and B.R. Ogle. (2018) Chapter 15: Hazardous Materials. In Friend, M.A., & J.P. Kohn (Eds.), Fundamentals of Occupational Safety and Health. Rockville, MD: Government Institutes
  • Lawson, M.E. and K.K. Hall (2017) Evaluation of a multivariate statistical modeling approach to identify sources and patterns of fecal pollution in the Tuckasegee River watershed in Western North Carolina. Abstract, American Society for Microbiology, 2017, ASM Microbe Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Hall, K.K. and P.R. Scheuerman. (2017) Development of multiple regression models to predict sources of fecal pollution. Water Environment Research. 89:1961-1969
  • Hall, K. K. (2016) Chapter 18: Emergency Response Planning. In Friend, M. A., & Ferry, T. S. (Eds.), Safety and Health Management Planning. Rockville, MD: Government Institutes
  • Zontek, T., K.K. (2016) Chapter 19: Hazardous Materials and Waste Management. In Friend, M. A., & Ferry, T. S. (Eds.), Planning and Managing the Safety System. Rockville, MD: Government Institutes
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