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Paul Worley

Paul Worley

Associate Professor

College of Arts and Sciences

English

Contact Information

Email: pmworley@wcu.edu
Office: 409 Coulter Building
Personal Website: paulmworley.com
Pronouns: he/him/his

Biography

I am Associate Professor of Global Literature at Western Carolina University, a Fulbright Scholar, and 2018 winner of the Sturgis Leavitt Award from the Southeastern Council on Latin American Studies. After completing my PhD in Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill, I was hired as an Assistant Professor of Spanish by the Department of Modern and Classical Languages at the University of North Dakota in Fall 2009. I joined the faculty at WCU in 2014.

Education

  • Ph D, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Ph D, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Comparative Literature
  • MA, Johns Hopkins University
  • BA, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Teaching Interests

Indigenous Literatures, Global Literatures, Latin American Literatures, Multi-lingual US literatures

Research Interests

Co-authored with Rita M. Palacios and published by the University of Arizona Press in 2019, my most recent book, <i>Unwriting Maya Literature</i>, received an Honorable Mention for best book in the Humanities from the Latin American Studies Association's México section in 2020. <i>Unwriting </i>examines contemporary Maya literary production in México and Guatemala through the Maya category <i>ts’íib</i>, a term that is frequently understood as “writing” that is actually a far more expansive, multimodal framework for cultural production.<br><br>Also published the University of Arizona Press in the fall of 2013, my book <i>Telling and Being Told: Storytelling and Cultural Control in Contemporary Mexican and Yukatek Maya Literatures</i> examines representations of Maya storytellers and storytelling in Yucatec Maya literatures. More broadly, my academic specialization is in contemporary Latin American literatures and cultures, with my research interests being Indigenous rights movements in the Americas, Global Literatures, Multi-lingual US literatures, and Digital Humanities.

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