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COVID-19 Regional Vaccine Clinic

Find Your Spot, Take Your Shot

The clinic is currently scheduling new appointments for anyone 16 years of age and older who wants to receive the vaccine.

Schedule Your Vaccine Appointment

PROGRAME SU CITA PARA VACUNAS

WCU's Vaccine Clinic location is located on the ground floor of the Health and Human Sciences Building at 3971 Little Savannah Road, Cullowhee, NC 28723 Once you arrive close to WCU campus, look for the purple and gold signs that say "vaccine clinic."

Clinic Hours - 8:30 am - 5:30 pm Monday through Friday
Clinic Phone Number - 828.227.8222 (VACC)

Please note, if you match any of the following you are not eligible for the vaccine:

  • You have had a severe allergic reaction causing anaphylaxis (wheezing, trouble breathing, swelling of throat/tongue etc.) after previous COVID-19 vaccine or a component of COVID-19 vaccine to include polyethylene glycol (PEG) or polysorbate.
  • You have received any other vaccine in the 14 days prior to scheduled vaccine.
  • You have received passive antibody therapy for COVID-19 infection in the past 90 days.


What is the COVID-19 Vaccine

Nurse in a clinic

 

Tested, safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines will help us get back in control of our lives and back to the people and places we love.

Scientists had a head start. The vaccines were built upon years of work to develop vaccines for similar viruses.

Tested, safe and effective. More than 70,000 people volunteered in clinical trials for two vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) to see if they are safe and work to prevent COVID-19 illness. Volunteers included Black/African Americans, Hispanics/Latinx, Asians and others. To date, the vaccines are 95% effective in preventing COVID-19 with no serious safety concerns noted in the clinical trials. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) makes sure the vaccines are safe and can prevent people from getting COVID-19. Like all drugs, vaccine safety continues to be monitored after they are in use.

You cannot get COVID-19 from the vaccine. You may have temporary reactions like a sore arm, headache or feeling tired and achy for a day or two after receiving the vaccine.

Supplies are very limited. Right now, very few vaccine doses are available.

Take your shot at no cost. The COVID-19 vaccine is available for free, whether or not you have insurance.

Additional Resources

The latest vaccine resources and information available from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services at covid19.ncdhhs.gov/vaccines

Find a Vaccine LocationFind Your Vaccine Group

¿CulA Es Me Grupo Para Vacunarme?

¿Dónde Me Puedo Vacunar?

Frequently Asked Questions

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) is managing the planning and distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine with local public health departments and healthcare providers.

WCU has been authorized to be a vaccine provider. Our clinic will be located on the groundfloor of the Health and Human Science Building, located off of Little Savannah Road.

The University does not have its own vaccine supply, nor does it have the authority to develop its own independent prioritization framework.

WCU will follow the guidelines set by NCDHHS and additional information is available here: covid19.ncdhhs.gov/vaccines.

The shot works well to keep you from getting sick from the virus. Both vaccines have a 95% success rate to stop you from getting sick. For the shot to work this well, you must have both shots. 

Anyone 16 years-old and older should receive the COVID-19 vaccine. No vaccines have been approved for children at this time. 

Side effects are normal. Most people have pain and swelling where the shot was given. You may also have fever, chills, feeling tired, and headache. Side effects may last 3-5 days. Side effects are usually worse after the second shot.

Learn more information

No long-term effects have been reported.  The COVID vaccines are new and still being studied.

The COVID vaccine works best after two shots. After the first shot, your body begins to fight the virus. After the second shot, your body’s response to fight the virus is even stronger. 

Each state decides when you can get the COVID vaccine. People are grouped based on how sick they may get or the type of work they do.  The groups are given their shots in phases.  See list of phases below (link).  In the long run, everyone will be offered the shot.

Learn more about which groups are currently eligible for the vaccine

 

Please note, if you match any of the following you are not eligible for the vaccine:

 

  1. You have had a severe allergic reaction causing anaphylaxis (wheezing, trouble breathing, swelling of throat/tongue etc.) after previous COVID-19 vaccine or a component of COVID-19 vaccine to include polyethylene glycol (PEG) or polysorbate.
  2. You have received any other vaccine in the 14 days prior to scheduled vaccine. 
  3. You have received passive antibody therapy for COVID-19 infection in the past 90 days.

When you come to get your shot please wear your mask and bring required papers. 

You will check-in and someone will enter your information in the computer. You will get a list of questions to answer. If you can’t read or understand the questions, someone will help you. Your answers will be read to make sure that it is safe for you to get the shot.

The shot is given in the upper arm. You will feel a small prick when the needle goes in.

After the shot you must wait 15 minutes to be sure that you are OK. Before you leave, someone will talk to you about side effects and when to get your second shot.

Be sure to eat a meal or at minimum a snack prior to your appointment.

It is free. 

The vaccine is paid for by our taxes. You can be charged for the supplies and the people giving you the shot.  If you have insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid, the cost is covered.

If you do not have insurance, you can get the shot and the cost is covered by the COVID-19 Relief Fund. 

If you have had COVID-19, you still need to get the vaccine. You can get the virus again and the shot can prevent you from getting sick and spreading it to others. If you have been treated for COVID-19, talk to your doctor before getting the shot.

Yes, everyone should get the COVID-19 shot to keep from getting very sick. If you have questions, check with your doctor.

After the shot, you still need to wear a mask.

You also need to stay 6 feet apart and wash your hands.  The chance spreading the virus will last until almost everyone has gotten their shots.

Additional information is available at covid19.ncdhhs.gov/vaccines

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