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Bardo Arts Center Blog

Bardo Arts Center turns 15 this year! Celebrate by exploring our blog to discover upcoming events and experiences from the WCU Fine Art Museum and the Bardo Arts Center (BAC) Performance Hall. Learn about our fall exhibitions, film screenings, and other opportunities, all available in a virtual format! Please note: Bardo Arts Center is not currently open to the general public, for more information visit arts.wcu.edu/covid-19.

WCU Fine Art Museum Cultivating Collections Exhibition with Colorful paintings visible of different sizes

Bardo Arts Center receives NC Arts Council Grant

Bardo Arts Center is pleased to announce a $7,5000 grant award from the NC Arts Council to support operations this fiscal year. The grant will specifically be used to support the WCU Fine Art Museum's new Collections Management System…  

Museum Tour Still

Interactive 360° Tour

Take the interactive 360° virtual tour of the WCU Fine Art Museum exhibition, Cultivating Collections: Paintings, Ceramics, and Works by Latinx and Latin American Artists. This multi-year series of exhibitions highlight specific areas of the WCU Fine Art Museum’s Collection, which includes over 1,800 works of art in a wide range of media by artists of the Americas.  

Nicole Brewer

Anti-Racist Arts Workshop

Nicole Brewer, creator of Conscientious Theatre Training and originator of the Anti-Racist Theatre (A.R.T.) movement is teaching her unique approach which blends anti-racist theory, social justice, collectivism, healing justice and theatre exercises for an embodied understanding of racism and our agency to become anti-racist.  

Virtual Opportunities

Virtual Opportunities

Explore a wide variety of virtual opportunities from the WCU Fine Art Museum at Bardo Arts Center (BAC), the BAC Performance Hall, and the Belcher College of Fine and Performing Arts. Discover on-demand experiences and a selection of upcoming virtual exhibitions, films, and more.   

David Skinner, Pink Flood, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 48 inches.

2021 School of Art and Design Faculty Biennial

Every two years, the WCU Fine Art Museum offers full-time and adjunct faculty in the School of Art and Design the opportunity to share their artwork with the University community through the Faculty Biennial exhibition. For this year’s Biennial, each faculty member contributed work that connects with the University’s 2020-2021 campus theme of Water.   

Tekki Lomnicki in Code of the Freaks

Code of the Freaks

Code of the Freaks presents a radical reframing of the use of disabled characters in film. Using hundreds of clips spanning over 100 years of moviemaking, and a cast of disabled artists, scholars and activists, it’s a scorching critique of some of Hollywood’s most beloved characters. This revelatory documentary investigates the power of movie imagery to shape the beliefs and behaviors of the general public toward disabled people, and of disabled people toward themselves.   

Picture Character Official Promo Image

SouthArts Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers

Although the Hall will be closed to the public, we are offering a streaming documentary film series featuring opportunities to meet various members of the film crew through a virtual post-film Q and A experience. The films are part of the SouthArts Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers and will be available to watch on any device, including your TV through a Roku and more. Further information, including ticketing details, coming soon!  

Picture Character Promo Poop Rock

Picture Character

The rapid rise 📈 of emoji (Japanese for “picture character”) is a global 🌍 phenomenon without precedent. Their widespread use and ability to convey complex messages have not only cemented emoji's place as an emerging digital language 🗣, but prompted difficult questions 🤔 about the creation of a language and digital communication’s fraught ties 😣 to identity and inclusion. In PICTURE CHARACTER, Directors Martha Shane and Ian Cheney lead viewers 👀 on a deep dive into the ever-evolving world of picture characters, from their humble beginnings in Japan 󾓥 to mobile keyboards 📱 the world 🌎 over, and shed fresh light 💡 on the private consortium 👥 that approves new emoji offerings and the individuals fighting ✊ to make the language more representative of its billions of users.  

Lonnie Holley in his studio in 2018

Thumbs Up for Mother Universe: The Lonnie Holley Story

After the world gave up on Lonnie Holley, the Universe sent him the gift of art. Born, one of 27 children in Jim Crow Alabama, Holley was stolen away as an infant and sold for a pint of whiskey. Growing up in grinding poverty and abuse on society’s margins left its scars. At age 28, Holley discovers making things quiets the demons that haunt him to this day. He begins to make art out of what the rest of us throw away—trash, garbage and debris. Now, nearing 70 years of age, his artwork sits in the Smithsonian, the National Gallery, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, while his music has garnered international critical acclaim for its stirring soulful depth. Thumbs Up for Mother Universe tells the story of how Lonnie Holley overcame the longest of odds to become an unlikely art superstar.  

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