Western Carolina University
 
 
 

WCU CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT STUDENTS
EVALUATE MAGGIE VALLEY POLICE DEPARTMENT PROJECT
  

Image: Construction management students (from left to right) Chris MacMillan from Charlotte, Brandon McCourry from Burnsville, Jared Merrill from Asheville and Scott Metcalf from High Point point out features of a site plan for the construction of a new police department in Maggie Valley to Police Chief Scott Sutton.
Construction management students (from left to right) Chris MacMillan from Charlotte, Brandon McCourry from Burnsville, Jared Merrill from Asheville and Scott Metcalf from High Point point out features of a site plan for the construction of a new police department in Maggie Valley to Police Chief Scott Sutton.
 

When Western Carolina University construction management students presented projected building costs, schedules and concerns Wednesday for a more than 5,000 square-foot police station in Maggie Valley, town officials listened.

WCU's Kimmel School of Construction Management, Engineering and Technology is partnering with the town of Maggie Valley to evaluate a police department building project.

For Western construction management students, the partnership is allowing them to bring together everything they have learned about planning, directing, coordinating and budgeting construction projects on an actual project that benefits an actual community.

For the town of Maggie Valley, the students' reports are helping officials develop a timeline for construction and compile information to consider as they make building decisions.

“They are helping us take the project from point A to point B,” said Maggie Valley Police Chief Scott Sutton.

Five groups of students traveled to the building site in Maggie Valley during the last three months, consulted professionals and worked with the latest prices of materials and software to prepare PowerPoint presentations, said Craig Capano, an associate professor of construction management who has more than 25 years in professional practice.  Dressed in ties and suits, they shared their ideas in a conference room at Western on Wednesday with Maggie Valley town officials and representatives from Dechant Architecture in Asheville and Dalton Construction in Franklin.

Some students pointed out the need to build a retaining wall before excavating the site. Others noted a delay because of the nearly two months it would take for manufacture and delivery of a specific elevator.

“Eight months may seem like a long time for the project, but this is a realistic completion date,” said Western senior Tyler Blue from Fayetteville.

Their audience asked questions: How would the projected rise in the cost of drywall change the total cost? How many days are included in the schedule for inclement weather? Would a temporary power line on a plan interfere with a building location?

“Good question,” said Chris MacMillan, a WCU senior from Charlotte.

The student team laughed for a moment and peered at the site plan before Terry Dalton of Dalton Construction Company, the person who asked the question, came to their rescue.

“I'll tell you how you can remedy this from my experience,” said Dalton, describing the use of an underground conduit.

That kind of interaction is exactly what Brandon McCourry, a WCU construction management program senior from Burnsville, said was so valuable. “They had good questions,” McCourry said. “They pointed out things from real-world experience that we hadn't thought of.”

The teams will make more detailed presentations at a Maggie Valley governing board meeting in April. For more information, contact Craig Capano at (828) 227-2438 or capano@email.wcu.edu .


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Last modified: Friday, March 17, 2006
Copyright 2006 by Western Carolina University