Return to Cherokee Phoenix homepage Return to Hunter Library homepage Return to WCU homepage
Cherokee Phoenix logo


CHEROKEE PHOENIX AND INDIANS' ADVOCATE
Wednesday, July 29, 1829
Vol. II, no. 17
Page 2, col. 5b-
Page 3, col. 1a

 Governor Houston.--The late mysterious conduct of this gentleman, in resigning his office, and leaving his family, &c. has been a subject of much animadversion.  Public curiosity has been aroused and various rumors and evil surmisings set afloat.  Any thing, therefore, in relation to the matter, in which confidence can be placed, will not fail to be interesting.  A letter to one of the Editors of this paper from a gentleman of respectability in Covington, Tennessee, dated 14th May, says, "Governor Houston, passed down the Mississippi a few days since in the steamer Red River, for the Cherokee Nation of Indians, in the Arkansas Territory.  He says he never wishes to see the face of a white man again-that when he gets to Red River, his cloth coat which he now wears, is to be destroyed, and he assumes the Indian costume throughout.  He is taking on a parcel of rifles, and says his policy will be by example, to inculcate peace and civilization among the Indians, and dissuade them from warring against one another, and particularly to bring about a peace between the Cherokees and Osages; that he will endeavor to cultivate a friendly feeling amongst them towards the United States.  The cause, or causes which have produced the unhappy separation of the Governor, from his lady, and resignation of office of Governor, are a profound secret, not known to his most intimate friends.  They are by solemn agreement of himself and lady, never to be divulged.  This information comes from a gentleman of the first veracity, and who passed in the same boat from Nashville as far as here, with the Governor, and who has long resided in Nashville, and who is well acquainted with  the whole affair.  The Governor was many years ago, when agent of the Cherokees, adopted by a celebrated chief of the nation, Jolly, as his son.  To him he will repair, and no doubt be well received.--Raleigh Star.