Service Animal Policy

The ADA limits the definition of Service Animals to dogs and miniature horses.

Therapy animals, emotional support animals, and companion animals are not Service Animals as defined by the ADA.

The work or tasks performed by a service animal must be directly related to the individual´s disability. Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to, assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing non-violent protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, assisting an individual during a seizure, alerting individuals to the presence of allergens, retrieving items such as medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and helping persons with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors.

 

Hunter Library follows the University Policy #82 regarding animals in the buildings.

University Policy #82, “Facilities Use and Public Art”

Hunter Library personnel are permitted to ask the following question pertaining to service animals:

  1. Is this a service animal needed for you as a person with a disability?”

A Service Animal must be under the control of the handler at all times. A Service Animal must not show aggression toward people or other animals. A Service Animal does not bark, growl or whine unless trained to do so as a warning sign to the handler. A Service Animal does not solicit food or other items from the general public. A Service Animal’s work does not disrupt the normal course of business. If any of these instances occur, you are allowed to ask the handler and animal to leave the business. You are still expected to provide the handler access to the materials or services that he or she has visited the library to receive.

Created April 10, 2017

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