RELATED INFORMATION

Liberal Studies Program

 
CONTACT US

226 Stillwell Building
Cullowhee, NC 28723
Map
Directions
828.227.7262 tel
828.227.7502 fax
amckenzie@wcu.edu

FACULTY/STAFF DIRECTORY

 
Philosophy and Religion and Liberal Studies

When you look at your Liberal Studies requirements keep us in mind; several philosophy and religion (“PAR”) courses fulfill the “P” (perspectives category) requirement.

PAR 190 (First-Year Seminar): “Freedom, Culture, and Technology”
Is technology a blessing or a curse? Do we have the wisdom to use technology responsibly or even safely? In this course we will study the debate between utopian and dystopian thinkers in classic works. 

PAR 145: “Eastern Religious Traditions”
Studies the historical, political, and theological contexts in which the major religious traditions of the East (Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Taoism) developed, with attention to distinctive ethical principles. (P6)

PAR 146: “Western Religious Traditions”
Historical, political, and theological contexts in which the major religious traditions of the West (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) developed with attention to noted ethical principles. (P3)

PAR 260: “Women and Religion”
Studies women's narratives and visions—feminist theologians, women mystics, female writers—as they reflect on spiritual life, marginalization, moral imagination, and community. (P6)

PAR 230: “Legal, Scientific, & Critical Reasoning”
Great for those considering law or medicine, this course studies the analysis of argument and the practical uses of critical reasoning in legal, scientific, and ethical case studies. (P4)

Read more about the Liberal Studies requirements (PDF)

These courses fulfill the upper-level Liberal Studies requirement: 

PAR 304: “Justice, Power and Human Nature in the Ancient Greek Polis”
We will study the ancient Greek thinkers who founded the Western liberal arts traditions, first raising central questions about human excellence, knowledge, justice, power, and historical meaning. (P4)

PAR 305: “Medieval Philosophy”
To write The Lord of the Rings, author J.R.R. Tolkien steeped himself in the work of such medieval philosophers as Augustine, Anselm, Averroes, Maimonides, Bonaventure, Aquinas, Scotus, and Ockham.

 

Copyright by Western Carolina University      •      Cullowhee, NC 28723      •      828.227.7211      •      Contact WCU
Maintained by the Office of Web Services      •      Directions      •      Campus Map      •      Emergency Information      •      Text-Only

Office of Web Services