Credit by Examination for ENGL 101 (Writing and Rhetoric)

Informational Meeting: Fall 2012 Schedule TBA.

Overview

The Credit by Examination requires a portfolio be submitted to determine whether the student should receive credit for English 101, a course required of all students at Western Carolina University, without taking the course. In order to receive credit for ENGL 101 the student's portfolio must clearly evidence mastery of the learning outcomes for that course (see rubric below). Portfolio's will be assessed a grade of 4 to 0.

Students making a 4 (A) or 3 (B)  on the examination will receive credit. Those making a 2 (C) do not receive credit, but are eligible for a waiver of the course requirement. That is, they are exempt from the ENGL 101 requirement but they do not receive the 3 credit hours for ENGL 101 and must make up those hours elsewhere to fulfill Liberal Studies and any other University requirements for which those hours would have counted. With a score of 1 or 0, credit may be earned only by regular enrollment during a subsequent semester. GPA will not be affected by the grade made on the examination.

Eligibility

 Any student who has not taken ENGL 101 is eligible to take the Credit by Examination.  Students who failed the class or dropped/withdrew after the drop/add period will NOT receive credit through the CbE.  During advising, students will be informed about the process for enrollment in the Credit by Examination course.  This Credit by Examination registration will provide access to a Blackboard "Course" where all materials must be submitted by the deadline indicated.

  • The non-refundable registration fee for Credit by Examination is $15.00 and is assessed at time of registration.
  • Failure to complete the Credit by Examination for ENGL 101 will not affect GPA nor will it be transcripted.  The registration fee will not be refunded.

Portfolio Requirements

What must be included in the portfolio (to be submitted in the Blackboard "course":

1. A research-based writing sample (between 3000 and 6000 words excluding cover page and bibliography). This sample should indicate knowledge of the correct integration, citation and documentation of authentic sources in a format appropriate to the discipline for which the piece is composed. It should also illustrate analytical reasoning and logical coherence while revealing a mastery of mechanics and grammar in a style appropriate to the intended audience.  Students are allowed to submit papers written for other classes or institutions.  It is not necessary to write a new paper for this section of the portfolio.

2. A critical reading of a selection from the English 101 textbook, Ways of Reading. The student will choose one of the essays made available through Blackboard and answer one of the "Questions for Writing" listed at the end of that selection. The student should offer a clear, correct and focused response to the essay and support his/her assertions with correct quotation of the essay itself.  The critical reading response between 1500 and 2000 words in length and should indicate effective use of critical thinking, the ability to integrate information and an understanding of the basics of rhetoric.

3. A reflective assessment of the portfolio based on the attached prompt (see WRCS Portfolio Prompt provided below) used in all English 101 classes. Using the writings submitted for the portfolio as evidence, the student should indicate his/her achievement of each learning objective. Students should read the prompt carefully and contact Margaret Bruder (mbruder@email.wcu.edu) Assistant Director of the WRCS program with any questions.

  • All work must be original writing.
  • Group projects and creative writing will not be accepted.
  • Using plagiarized work (undocumented material from any source) constitutes a violation of the University's Academic Integrity policy and students submitting plagiarized work as part of the Credit by Examination will result in the student being reported to the Department of Student Community Ethics for disciplinary action (see Handbook for complete information on Academic Integrity).

WRCS Challenge Exam Assessment

Student will…

Writing demonstrates…

Identify and employ all stages of the writing process, individually and collaboratively, using appropriate technologies and document design

effective use of revision and editing processes within writing selection

Identify and demonstrate clear purpose and attention to designated audience to address and solve complex problems within and between their discourse communities

clear purpose and attention to designated audience within writing

Individually and collaboratively utilize appropriate, scholarly research processes to locate effective resources for a defined communication purpose

selection and use of critical reading, discussion and synthesis of scholarly research

Exhibit clear, sound reasoning in their analysis and synthesis of both individual and scholarly information

effective use of critical thinking, invention and integration of information

Exhibit an understanding of the power of rhetoric as it affects diversity, public policy, and their role as responsible citizens

writing demonstrates an understanding of the basics of rhetoric and issues that affect student's discourse communities


Scale

No Score: 0

Emerging

Developing

Achieving

Exemplary

A score of zero designates folders and/or content that cannot be viewed or assessed

Writer is just beginning to emerge as a researcher, analyzer, synthesizer, and writer but does not yet meet all assignment expectations.  Writer recognizes that information is available through a variety of sources, gathers information relevant to problem, and offers available or prescribed solutions.

Writer is developing toward expectancy level at meeting assignment expectations as a researcher, analyzer, synthesizer, and writer.  Writer identifies assignment requirements, integrates information from a variety of sources, conveys basic information, demonstrates competency with mechanical skills and final proofreading.

Writer functions at expectancy level by meeting assignment requirements as a researcher, analyzer, synthesizer, and writer.  Writer integrates information from a variety of information sources through critical inquiry, develops strategies, and evaluates and improves writing through revision.

Writer functions at a superior level by exceeding assignment expectations as a researcher, analyzer, synthesizer, and writer. Writer makes choices, selects appropriate information by evaluating quality and credibility of sources, evaluates the quality and credibility of information, and articulates viable solutions to intended audience appropriately and respectfully.

Scoring

1

2

3

4

 


 

WRCS Portfolio Prompt

(This prompt is provided to all ENGL 101 students.  Students wishing to enroll in the Credit by Examination will respond to the same prompt as all other ENGL 101 students. See Portfolio Requirements #3.  Sample Portfolios are available on the Blackboard course page.)

For your final project in your writing class, you will create a portfolio document based on your writings over the course of the semester. Using any of the work that you have already generated for the class as evidence for your claims, as well as instructor comments, or any other feedback on your work that you have received over the course of the semester, you should reflect upon your experiences with and progress towards the five learning outcomes listed in the syllabus.

  • You will submit this document as a single MS Word document or PDF document no larger than 1MB in file size, and you should support your claims with evidence from your assignments and activities in this class.

You might consider your portfolio as your final research project, with yourself and your writing as the subject, and with your own writings as supporting materials.  You will be drawing upon your own, previously generated work as your primary source of evidence for your claims.  At the end of the document please provide a list of the assignments or writings of yours that you refer to in this final reflection.  You should reference specific evidence from those writings in order to substantiate your claims about your progress through the course. 

Your portfolio should thoroughly address the five following outcomes/issues.  We have provided a series of questions for each outcome to prompt your thinking:

1) Identify and employ all stages of the writing process, individually and collaboratively, using appropriate technologies and document design

  • How would you describe your writing process? 
  • What does your writing process consist of (what does your process look like)? 
  • How does your writing process vary with different writing tasks? 
  • How has your writing processes changed, if at all, over the course of the semester? 
  • How do you incorporate feedback from peers and instructors into your writing process in order to produce more rhetorically effective writing? 
  • How have you made use of appropriate technologies and design features in your writing process? 
  • Use evidence from your own work over the course of the semester to support your claims about your writing process.

2) Identify and demonstrate clear purpose and attention to designated audiences in order to address and solve complex problems within and between their discourse communities.

  • How, if at all, do you conceive of an audience when you begin writing?  How do or have you addressed the needs of specific audiences in your writing? 
  • How might addressing the needs of a specific audience or audiences help to resolve conflicts of various sorts? 
  • How can different audiences and discourse communities address each other both effectively and respectfully, given the fact that they are different in the first place, and often in profound ways? 
  • Use evidence from your own work over the course of the semester to support your claims about addressing the specific needs of defined audiences in your writing.

3) Individually and collaboratively utilize appropriate, scholarly research processes to locate effective resources for a defined communication purpose.

  • What is the status of your research skills, both academic and extra-academic? 
  • How have you developed and demonstrated your research skills over the course of the semester? 
  • What research tools do you regularly use? 
  • How do you anticipate that you might be able to apply and continue to develop these skills as you progress through your major? 
  • What resources have you identified to draw upon when you have difficulties conducting research or finding useful source materials? 
  • How do you document or cite your research in ways that are appropriate to scholarly writing?  
  • Use evidence from your own work over the course of the semester to support your claims about your research skills.

4) Exhibit clear, sound reasoning in the analysis and synthesis of both individual and scholarly information.

  • How have you synthesized diverse research materials into coherent, consistent, and logically formulated arguments or analyses? 
  • How does your writing demonstrate an ability to synthesize complex ideas in a manner that is accessible and understandable to your readers? 
  • Use evidence from your own work over the course of the semester to support your claims about your abilities to synthesize diverse sets of materials and modes of thinking.

5) Exhibit an understanding of the power of rhetoric as it affects diversity, public policy, and their role as responsible citizens.

  • How would you describe rhetoric? 
  • What is the role of rhetoric and rhetorical skills in policymaking, citizenship, and community (broadly defined)? 
  • How do you think we should, or if we even can, ensure that rhetoric is used ethically, and not used to persuade audiences to undertake unjust actions? 
  • Use evidence from your own work over the course of the semester to support your claims about the role of rhetoric in our culture.

Your portfolio should be a reflection on your progress and evolving understanding of rhetoric and writing over the course of the semester.  The examples from your previous work that you cite should demonstrate that progress or evolution. You may structure this document in any way that you like, and you should feel free to integrate examples of all kinds of texts.

Microsoft Word can accommodate a variety of inserted objects, so be creative in how you put your portfolio together. The Technology Commons has workshops and one-on-one consultations that can help you make the most of the materials you have to work with.  Please contact your instructor with any questions, sooner rather than later. 

Your completion of this portfolio is a requirement for the successful completion of the course.  You will receive credit for completing it in its entirety.  Because we are seeking your own, frank assessment of yourself, your portfolio will be evaluated to see if it is complete, but you will not be evaluated on the basis of its claims. 

 

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